Holistic Vegan, Vegetarian, and Yoga Cruises
Home  |  Holistic Cruises  |  Past Events  |  About Us  |  In the Media  |  Sponsors  |  Contact Us  |  Blog |  Shop

Archive for the ‘Vegan Cuisine’ Category

Vegan Thanksgiving Recipes Everyone Will Love

Posted on:

If you’re following a vegan or vegetarian diet, Thanksgiving can be an especially difficult holiday to spend around the table with omnivorous friends and family who cook with dairy, eggs, and meat. Besides hosting your own plant-based Thanksgiving dinner, another option is to offer to bring appetizers, sides, main courses, or desserts wherever you’ve been invited to dine.

We asked a few Holistic Holiday at Sea presenters for some of their favorite recipes to help you prepare foods that are not only tasty, but healthy and kind to animals. Now, isn’t that the perfect way to truly give thanks?

Tasty Plant-Based Side Dishes

Many traditional Thanksgiving ingredients are naturally vegan: green beans, sweet potatoes, brussels sprouts, mushrooms, carrots, cranberries, squash, and root vegetables. Matt Frazier, founder of No Meat Athlete, tells us, “For a plant-based Thanksgiving, my favorite approach is to make a lot of side dishes, which I’ve always considered the most interesting part of Thanksgiving dinner anyway. With enough good side dishes, you don’t even need to worry about replacing the turkey. This also works well if you’ll be a guest at a non-vegan table: bring along a few sides, and you’ll know that even if there’s nothing else for you to eat, at least you can load up your plate with the dishes you brought, while also being able to contribute something to the meal.”

The No Meat Athlete Cookbook: Whole Food, Plant-Based Recipes to Fuel Your Workouts and the Rest of Your Life (2017), written by Matt and longtime health coach, yoga teacher, and nutrition writer Stepfanie Romine, contains 150 whole food, vegan recipes. Here is one of them!

Tahini Green Beens by No Meat Athlete Matt Frazier

Tahini Green Beans by No Meat Athlete

Tahini Green Beans* from Matt Frazier

Serves: 2 to 4

Time: 15 minutes

This recipe quickly entered regular rotation for everyone who tested it; the tahini and sesame seeds make green beans incredibly enticing with very little effort. If you are a dipper, serve the sauce on the side and eat the green beans like fries. This technique also works with steamed or roasted broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, or beets.

Ingredients

1 pound (454 g) green beans, washed and trimmed

2 tablespoons gluten-free tahini

1 garlic clove, minced

Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon

Salt and black pepper

1 teaspoon toasted black or white sesame seeds, optional

Instructions

  1. Steam the beans in a medium saucepan fitted with a steamer insert (or by adding 1⁄4 cup/60 ml water to a covered saucepan) over medium-high heat. Drain, reserving the cooking water.
  2. Mix the tahini, garlic, lemon zest and juice, and salt and pepper to taste. Use the reserved cooking water to thin the sauce as desired.
  3. Toss the green beans with the sauce and serve warm or at room temperature. Garnish with the sesame seeds, if using.

From frozen: Use a pound of frozen French-style haricots verts. Run them under hot water until thawed, and drain well.

 

*Recipe from The No Meat Athlete Cookbook: Whole Food, Plant-Based Recipes to Fuel Your Workouts and the Rest of Your Life © Matt Frazier and Stepfanie Romine, 2017. Photographs copyright © Ken Carlson, Waterbury Publications Inc. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Available wherever books are sold. theexperimentpublishing.com

Creamy Mushroom Bisque

Warm up on with a bowl of this delicious soup. This recipe by Bryanna Clark Grogan can be found in the book Dr. Neal Barnard’s Program for Reversing Diabetes: The Scientifically Proven System for Reversing Diabetes Without Drugs by Neal Barnard, M.D.

A food processor turns this soup into a rich, creamy treat with a delightful mushroom flavor. Take comfort in knowing that this is lower in fat than your conventional dairy-laden bisque.

Serves: 4

Ingredients

1 small onion, finely chopped

freshly ground black pepper, to taste

2 tablespoons dry sherry

2 teaspoons reduced-sodium soy sauce

salt, to taste

12 ounces mushrooms, sliced

2/3 cup old-fashioned rolled oats

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme

1 bay leaf

5 cups low-sodium mushroom broth

dairy-free (vegan) parmesan cheese substitute (optional)

Instructions

  1. Steam-fry onion in a heavy nonstick skillet over medium heat until soft but not browned, adding very small amounts of water as needed to prevent sticking and burning. (Or place in a microwavable dish, cover, and microwave on high for 3 minutes.)
  2. Place broth, bay leaf, thyme, and oats in a medium saucepan. Add onion and bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes, or until oats are soft.
  3. Meanwhile, steam-fry mushrooms in a large, heavy nonstick skillet over high heat, adding a sprinkle of salt and very small amounts of water as needed to prevent sticking and burning. Cook until mushrooms release and reabsorb their liquid. Remove from heat and set aside.
  4. When oats are soft, remove bay leaf and puree the soup until creamy with a hand-held blender or in batches in a blender or food processor. (Remove the middle part of the blender or food processor’s lid so hot air can escape. Cover the hole loosely with a folded clean cloth while blending.)
  5. Return the soup to the pan and add mushrooms, soy sauce, sherry, if using, salt, black pepper, and vegan parmesan substitute, if using. Serve hot.

Game Day Twice Baked Potato Skins from Rip Esselstyn

Game Day Potato Skins (photo courtesy of Rip Esselstyn)

Rip Esselstyn, founder of Engine 2 and author of The Engine 2 Diet (2009) and Plant-Strong: Discover the World’s Healthiest Diet (2015), shared with us this recipe from The Engine 2 Diet.

Serves: 8

Ingredients

¼ cup red bell pepper, seeded and chopped

½ cup yellow onion, chopped

½ cup spinach, chopped

½ cup yellow corn

½ cup nutritional yeast

½ cup low sodium BBQ sauce

2 teaspoons smoked paprika

½ teaspoon black pepper

8 medium to large Russet potatoes

 

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Wash the potatoes and place in the oven on a baking sheet for 60 minutes, or until fork tender.
  3. In a small bowl, combine the bell pepper, onion, spinach and corn.
  4. When the potatoes are done baking, remove from the oven and allow to cool for several minutes for easier slicing.
  5. Slice the potatoes in half length-wise and scoop out the potato flesh, leaving the skin and some potato as your empty skin to load with filling.
  6. Place the scooped-out potato in a large bowl. Add the nutritional yeast, BBQ sauce, black pepper and one teaspoon of the smoked paprika.
  7. Use a potato masher or a large spoon to combine the spices and BBQ sauce with the potatoes to make a mash.
  8. Combine the vegetables in the small bowl with the potato mixture in the large bowl.
  9. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
  10. Fill the empty potato skins with the vegetable and potato mixture.
  11. Sprinkle the remaining teaspoon of smoked paprika on the potatoes.
  12. Bake the filled potato skins for 30 minutes. Serve with BBQ sauce for dipping.

 

Gene Baur with Bubbles, the turkey (photo courtesy of Farm Sanctuary)

Save a Turkey

Commemorating a holiday with friends and family over a dead bird doesn’t really make much sense, does it? Farm Sanctuary’s Adopt a Turkey program, which began in 1986, has led to the rescue of more than 1,000 turkeys from brutal deaths. This program gives us the chance to sponsor a rescued turkey at one or more of the Farm Sanctuary shelters. We are so excited Farm Sanctuary co-founder Gene Baur will join us once again on the upcoming cruise.

In lieu of meat, amaze guests with the tofu turkey from Jessica Porter, author of The MILF Diet and The Hip Chick’s Guide to Macrobiotics, or Lynn’s Meatloaf brought to us by athlete, firefighter, and author Rip Esselstyn (both below).

Tofu Turkey with Mushroom Gravy from Jessica Porter

Serves: 8-12

This recipe is an adaptation of one I got from Jane Quincannon Stanchich, one of my closest friends and a fantastic chef. She is a gem.

Equipment

Handheld blender or food processor

A medium-sized colander

Cheesecloth

A baking sheet

A pastry brush

Aluminum foil

A skillet

A large measuring cup

Knife, wooden spoons, and the other usual stuff

 

Ingredients

5 lbs extra firm tofu

Shoyu

Toasted sesame oil

Onions (lots)

Mushrooms (lots)

Celery (a few stalks)

Seitan (if you like it)

Unyeasted, whole wheat sourdough bread, in cubes

Poultry seasoning (as much as you want)

 

Ingredients for Gravy

Onions

Mushrooms (optional)

Water

Shoyu

Mirin (optional)

Brown rice vinegar (optional)

Kuzu

 

Instructions for the “Turkey”

The night before: Whiz the 5 lbs. of tofu in a really big bowl with a handheld blender. If you don’t have one, it’s a great time to go get one. They are cheap ($30?) and soooooooo useful. Or, If you don’t have one and aren’t going to get one, you can puree the tofu in a food processor, in batches, until it’s all smooth and creamy. There may be a few lumps, but nothing big. As you are blending, add about 2 tablespoons of shoyu to the tofu to give it a little extra taste. The more daring may add some herbs…

You now have a 5 lb blob of tofu. Congratulations! Take a colander (medium-sized or smallish are best—the bigger the colander, the flatter the “turkey” will be) and line it with a double layer of cheesecloth, with about six inches extra on each side. Place the colander on a big plate or baking sheet. Spoon your tofu blob into the cheesecloth-lined colander until it molds completely to the colander. A little tofu “milk” will start coming through the colander. That’s good. That’s why you’re doing this, to press all excess liquid out of the tofu, making it a sturdier turkey. Fold the extra cheese cloth over the top of the tofu and place a plate and a weight on top of that. Let sit overnight in the fridge.

The next day: Take the turkey out of the fridge. Pour off any extra tofu liquid that seeped out overnight from the baking sheet or whatever you had the colander sitting on. Remove the weight, the plate, and pull back the extra cheese cloth to reveal the bottom of the “dome” that will be your turkey. Now here’s the tricky part: You must now dig into the upside-down dome, with your hand, creating a space in the middle that you will put the stuffing into. Try to dig so that you leave about 1/2 to 1 inch of tofu between you and the colander—in other words, so the dome maintains a decent thickness all round. If you find that you dig too far, you can repair it with tofu, but do your best to dig a nice ditch in the tofu, leaving the walls of the dome thick enough to protect the stuffing. Does that make sense?

Now you have a pile of tofu and an upside-down dome of tofu. Your parents must be very proud!

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees and start working on the stuffing:

 

Instructions for Stuffing:

In a skillet, heat the oil, and saute the onions and a pinch of salt for about 5 minutes. Add the mushrooms and another pinch of salt. Add celery, seitan, poultry seasoning and bread. Sprinkle with shoyu to taste. You know what you like in a stuffing. Do whatever you want to achieve that. Make way more than you need because extra stuffing is one of life’s great benefits. When the stuffing makes you all happy and say “ooooo,” then place it in the dome of tofu, packing it down well. Take the rest of your dug-out tofu (leaving aside about 1/2 cup) and place it on top of the stuffing (and on top of the dome edges), making a bottom for the dome. Pack it down well.

Tricky part number two: Now, take a baking sheet and place it over the colander. Make sure it covers it completely. Hold them together tightly. In a graceful and quick maneuver, flip the whole colander upside-down, so that your dome now sits on the baking sheet. Remove the colander. Remove the cheesecloth, and voila! That’s your un-cooked “turkey.” If there are any cracks in the turkey, do your best to repair them with your leftover tofu. If they are really bad, just chalk it up to experience–you’ll do much better next year (or try again at Christmas!) and this will still taste great.

Make a mixture of 2 parts sesame oil to 1 part shoyu and, using a pastry brush, baste the turkey with it. Be generous with the basting. Cover the turkey with aluminum foil and bake for 1 hour. Uncover, baste again and cook for 15 more minutes, uncovered. Baste one more time and cook for 15 minutes more. Let sit for 1 hour before cutting, while you make your gravy!!

 

Instructions for Gravy

Dice a bunch of onions and mushrooms. Saute onions first, with a pinch of salt, until translucent and yummy, then add mushrooms, another pinch of salt, and saute until softened and wilty.

Apparently, I just made up that word: Wilty. I know that because my computer has put a red line beneath it. Oh well.

Anyway, pour some water in a large measuring cup and add water to this saute, equalling the amount of gravy you want. You have the measuring cup so that you know how much liquid you’re using—you will need to know this for when you add the kuzu later. So make a mental note of it.

Then add shoyu, carefully, to taste (you might want to start with 1 teaspoon per cup of liquid, and add from there if desired). I haven’t given strict measurements here because a) I’m lazy and b) you are the arbiter of your gravy’s strength and saltiness. You can also add mirin (about 1/3 the amount of shoyu you put in) and a dash of brown rice vinegar, if you like. I find that the combo of the shoyu, mirin and just a touch of brown rice vinegar makes for a nice meaty flavor in the gravy.

Let it all come to a boil and then simmer for at least 10 minutes.

Now, measure out the equivalent of 1 level tablespoon of kuzu per cup of gravy liquid. If it’s not perfect, don’t worry–if the gravy ends up being not thick enough, you can add more kuzu, and if it’s too thick, you can add more water and shoyu. I think gravy should be a pleasurable, sort of intuitive dish, so don’t get too hung up on it.

What you need to get hung up on, though, is that kuzu needs to be diluted in cold water and be lump-free before being added to the gravy. If you add chunks of undiluted kuzu, they will become unbreakable lumps in the gravy. So when your kuzu is nice and diluted (you can break it up with your fingers in the cold water—I recommend that), add it slowly to the gravy as you stir it vigorously. The gravy will become glossy and thicken. Let it come to a boil, then reduce flame to a simmer. If the gravy is not thick enough for you, add more kuzu. If it’s too thick, add more liquid. Once you’ve gotten the thickness right, let it simmer for about 10 minutes before serving on slices of tofu turkey.

 

Cranberry Sauce from Jessica Porter

Serves 12

1 bag cranberries – usually 12 ounces

grated zest and juice of 2 oranges

3/4 cup maple syrup or more if you want it sweeter

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon (or one cinnamon stick)

1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom

3/4 cup of water

If cooking in a saucepan: heat your cranberries, orange zest and juice, maple syrup and spices over medium to high heat.  After 7 to 10 minutes add the water and stir for another five. Serve chilled.

 

Lynn’s Meatloaf from Rip Esselstyn

This is a great “meat” loaf recipe from one of the Engine 2 Pilot Study participants, Lynn Jocelyn. Lynn brought this to the Engine 2 pot-luck awards banquet and it disappeared before everyone could get a bite. She graciously brought two loaves over for Jill and me one week after Kole was born.

Lynn's Meatloaf with Kale Salad (photo courtesy of Rip Esselstyn)

Lynn’s Meatloaf with Kale Salad (photo courtesy of Rip Esselstyn)

Ingredients

2 stalks celery, chopped

½ onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed

10 ounces firm tofu, drained

¼ cup walnuts, finely ground

1 ½ cups cooked brown lentils

1 ¼ cups quick-cooking oats

3 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tablespoons ketchup

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

2 teaspoons dried parsley

½ teaspoon each thyme, sage and rosemary

Ketchup, to taste (for topping)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Sauté celery, onion and garlic on high heat in skillet with a little water or low sodium vegetable broth for 5 minutes or until tender. Remove from heat and cool.
  3. Mash tofu in a large bowl.
  4. Stir in cooked mixture and remaining ingredients, combining well.
  5. Spoon mixture into a loaf pan. Top with a layer of ketchup. Bake for 55 to 60 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean.

Apple Roses (photo by Melissa Karpel)

Remember Dessert!

Melissa Karpel, Philanthropic Specialist with the PETA Foundation, is loving these Vegan Rose desserts by Elephantastic Vegan: “Making delicious meals is easy anytime of the year, including Thanksgiving! Impress any guests, vegan or not, with these easy vegan rose desserts. I just made these the other day and they are really beautiful. I added a mixture of chopped walnuts, Earth Balance margarine, and cinnamon.” So good and so vegan!”

Here’s Melissa’s version of the recipe by Elephantastic Vegan.

Ingredients

1 package vegan puff pastry dough

1 Red Delicious apple

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon Earth Balance (optional)

1 lemon slice

Walnuts (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Take the vegan puff pastry dough out of the fridge to thaw for 30 minutes.
  3. Slice the apple into very thin slices. Boil in a mixture of water with lemon juice (to prevent browning) for a few minutes until soft.
  4. When the puff pastry dough is thawed, roll it out into a thin sheet and cut into horizontal strips no wider than 2 inches.
  5. Lay the apples along the edge of the dough strips from one end to the other, with the rounded side of the apple at the top. Place the apple slices on the pastry dough strips.
  6. Roll each strip from left to right onto itself. It turns into little roses!
  7. Place each one in a greased muffin tin.
  8. (Optional) Combined a mixture of small walnut pieces, melted vegan margarine, and cinnamon into a bowl and sprinkle on top or place inside.
  9. Bake for about 35 minutes. If the apples burn, move to a lower shelf in the oven.

Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

From our Holistic Holiday at Sea family to yours, we wish you a wonderful Thanksgiving. There is so much we are grateful for—including you! Enjoy trying out these recipes and spending time with those you love. See you onboard in February!

More Benefits to Syrup Than Just Amazing Taste: Crown Maple Sets a New Industry Standard

Posted on:

Enter Our Giveaway for Free Products!

(Photos courtesy of Crown Maple)

Crown Maple Estate

Crown Maple Estate

Naturally vegan, GMO-free, and gluten-free, maple syrup and maple sugar are two of nature’s healthiest sweeteners. Since Robb and Lydia Turner launched Crown Maple in 2010, the business has quickly become one of the most beloved brands of maple syrup on the market. Last year, Crown Maple was the fourth largest maple producer in the USA, with more than 5,000 acres of maple farms in New York and Vermont.

Attendees on our 2017 Holistic Holiday at Sea cruise were very excited to eat dishes made with this wonderful syrup, and take home samples of Crown Maple’s products. A huge thank-you to Crown Maple for being one of our 2017 sponsors! We wanted to dig a little deeper into the story behind the flavor and take a look at why the harvesting methods are sustainable and protect the environment. We also wanted to share a special August giveaway for Crown Maple products so you can taste the difference for yourself!

Sustainable Harvesting

The Crown Maple Estate (also known as Madava Farms) is an 800-acre organic family farm in New York’s Hudson Valley where all production and and bottling takes place. Visitors can take a tour of the Estate and go behind the scenes in the sugarhouse. Mike Cobb, CEO of Maple Crown, says that the farm typically produces .4–.5 gallons of syrup per tap (which translates to 60,000 gallons per year). Wow, that’s a lot!

With more than 120,000 taps in 2017, the process of harvesting maple is very environmentally conscious and workers use state-of-the-art technology. “We tap the trees with care toward sustainability—proper location and proper number of taps based on tree size,” says Mike. “We take less than 10% of a tree’s sap.”

Health Benefits of Maple

Not only are maple syrup and maple sugar flavorful, but they are great for your health. Mike shares that Crown Maple fits naturally into today’s lifestyle:

  • Healthy sweetener with antioxidant benefits & lower glycemic index than most popular sweeteners
  • All natural, sustainable, 100% pure from nature
  • Certified organic, kosher, vegan, paleo
  • Gluten-free, gmo free, has no preservatives, clean
  • Enriches and enhances savory flavors
  • Deepens sweetness and caramelization
  • Versatility of use for topping, baking, saucing, basting, finishing, mixology

In addition to many specialty items, Crown Maple also produces infused maple syrup (such as the Madagascar Vanilla and Cinnamon). The Bourbon Barrel Aged adds flavor to beverages—and fruit, ice cream, and pies!

Recently, the grading system for maple syrup changed (you won’t find Grade B on the shelves anymore). All maple syrup at Crown Maple is Grade A and the four varieties of grades are:

  1. Golden Color Delicate Taste
  2. Amber Color Rich Taste
  3. Dark Color Robust Taste
  4. Very Dark Color Strong Taste.

The Amber Color Rich Taste presents a medium-body feel with aromas and flavors of gingerbread, roasted chestnut, toffee. The Very Dark Color Strong Taste, on the other hand, presents deeply caramelized flavors and aromas of molasses, crème brûlée, espresso, and cocoa beans.

Recipe for Vegan Maple-Roasted Brussels, Shallots, and Farro Salad

Maple-Roasted Brussels, Shallots, and Farro Salad

Maple-Roasted Brussels, Shallots & Farro Salad

We want to share this recipe from Robb Turner’s book The Crown Maple Guide to Maple Syrup.

Prep Time: 5 Minutes | Cook Time: 30 to 35 Minutes

Serves 4

1 cup (200 g) dried farro
Kosher salt to taste
1 tablespoon plus ¼ cup (75 ml) olive oil
2 pounds (910 g) Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
4 to 5 medium shallots, sliced
2 tablespoons Crown Maple syrup (Amber Color, Rich Taste), or more to taste
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar, or more to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
¼ cup (13 g) chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C); line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.
  2. Put the farro in a small saucepan and cover with 3 cups (720 ml) water and a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cover. Cook the farro for 25 minutes, or until the grains are tender but still have a little chew to them. Drain in a colander. Transfer to a large bowl and toss with the 1 tablespoon oil.
  3. While the farro cooks, roast the vegetables: Spread the Brussels sprouts and shallots on the prepared baking sheet. Drizzle the maple syrup, the remaining ¼ cup (60 ml) oil, and the vinegar over the top, and season with salt and pepper. Use your hands to toss the vegetables right on the sheet.
  4. Roast the vegetables for 25 to 30 minutes, turning halfway through, until the shallots have softened and the Brussels sprouts are crisped around the edges.
  5. Add the vegetables to the bowl with the farro, and add the parsley. Toss to combine, and add more maple syrup, vinegar, and salt and pepper to taste. Serve warm.

Enter Our Sweepstakes & Taste for Yourself!

Royal Treatment Dark Bottle

From August 21–28, we are holding a special giveaway on the HHAS Facebook page, thanks to Crown Maple!

Triple Pack

Two lucky winners will each receive Crown Maple’s Royal Treatment Box (dark color), pictured on left.

One grand prize winner will receive the Deluxe Crown Maple Trio (one Dark Color and Robust Taste; one Very Dark Color and Strong Taste, and one Bourbon Barrel Aged Maple), pictured on right. “Like” the post and tag a friend in the comments for your chance to win!

Vegan Cruise Turns 15: A Look Back Through the Years!

Posted on:

Holistic Holiday at Sea 15th Anniversary-1February 15–25, 2018, Holistic Holiday at Sea will embark on its 15th vegan cruise! Over the years, more than 15,000 cruise goers have come aboard to learn more about plant-based lifestyles in presentations and classes by world-renowned doctors, holistic practitioners, chefs, athletes, and other influential leaders. The cruise organizers are so excited to celebrate this milestone with you as they have many new and fun things planned for this upcoming voyage.

Since 2004, Holistic Holiday at Sea has grown exponentially, with so many wonderful memories made. The plant-based movement has come so very far in recent years. Such an event wouldn’t be possible if it wasn’t for the support of a vibrant and compassionate community.

 

The Growth of a Movement

Although it was back in 2004, it feels like just yesterday the ship first set sail from Port Everglades with 410 people, traveling across the beautiful Caribbean Sea. The small, but mighty, group visited Key West, Mexico, Jamaica, and the Grand Cayman Islands.Holistic Holiday at Sea cuisine

Participants learned from amazing presenters, such as the late Michio Kushi, who was a pioneer in the natural foods movement and an earlier proponent of the idea that one’s diet, environment, and health are connected. After the cruise, Michio said it was a great success: “People who worked to care for the participants were very entertaining. Throughout the period at sea, weather was continuously fine celebrating our dream. People could study, enjoy macrobiotic meals, sing together with Italian music and develop friendships. I hope everyone will join in the future.”

Guests on the cruise started off as strangers and quickly developed friendships and connections (many of the romantic variety!) that continued even after everyone returned home. 2004 was certainly an amazing beginning.

During this last cruise, 1,650 people shared the week with one another! This tremendous growth is due to a variety of factors, including the strength of the vegan movement itself. Sandy Pukel, HHAS president and founder, say it’s always been the cruise’s mission to help people choose lifestyles that will make them happier and healthier. Back then, however, he says it was almost like a secret society of people who followed vegan or macrobiotic lifestyles. But times have changed. “Now it’s okay to shout it from the rooftops,” he adds.

Michio Kushi

Michio Kushi

More doctors are also becoming more outspoken about their scientific findings. “In the beginning, we had maybe a hundred doctors (MDs) on the cruise, but only 10 or 20 would say they were doctors because they were going against the accepted culture at the time of being vegan and being an MD and espousing this kind of philosophy and lifestyle. Now we have 150 doctors on there who are proud to say they’re part of it. It has become kind of like a magnet for people to see those doctors who are into alternative health.” Many of these doctors are presenters and participants in the CME program, earning continuing education credits. The CME program itself is a testament to the demand for education around the science of nutrition and wellness.

There are also more families and multi-generational groups on the cruise now than before. Sandy says that many people came in the beginning and “put their toes in the water,” so to speak, to see what it was all about. Those who raised their children with vegan or vegetarian diets are bringing them on the cruise for an educational and cultural experience. Guests of all ages can enjoy delicious food, engaging workshops, and exotic ports of call.

Is it Nutritional or Ethical?

Many people ask if this conference at sea gives a nutritional or an ethical emphasis on veganism. Well, it provides both—and more! Due to an increasing demand, Holistic Holiday at Sea is continuously expanding the focus to include more animal advocacy and environmental presentations and discussion. The mission has always been centered on education and there’s so much under this umbrella.

Neal Barnard at Holistic Holiday at Sea

Dr. Neal Barnard

Last year, new presenters included animal rights activists Jonathan Balcombe, author of What a Fish Knows and Gene Baur, co-founder and president of Farm Sanctuary. Returning again in 2018, they will continue to share their compassion and knowledge, giving voices to so many animals who suffer from factory farming and horrific food industry practices.

Many presenters return again and again. Dr. T. Colin Campbell, author of The China Study and Whole, and Dr. Neal Barnard, founder of Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, have participated nearly every year.

2018 brings many new presenters, including health activist and food writer Rip Esselstyn, registered dietitian and nutritionist Julieanna Hever, and Dr. Ron Weiss, founder of Ethos Health. HHAS is also welcoming Ingrid Newkirk onboard. As president and founder of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), Ingrid has spoken around the world on animals rights issues.

When Learning is Fun

Sandy stands by the idea that “no one minds learning when they’re having a good time.” For the 15th cruise, instead of the usual seven days, the cruise will be extended to ten days, including President’s Day weekend. In addition to participating in onboard adventure (including poolside socials and entertainment), guests will certainly have a good time exploring the ports of call.Holistic Holiday at Sea

While the ship’s route alternates between the Eastern and Western Caribbean every year (guests have been to more than a dozen coastal cities and towns), there are always new spots to see. The 2018 ports of call are primarily brand new to the cruise. The MSC Divina will depart from Miami, Florida, and head to the following ports of call in the southeastern Caribbean: St. John’s, Antigua and Barbuda; Basseterre, St. Kitts and Nevis; Fort-de-France, Martinique; Philipsburg, St. Maarten; Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands; and Freeport, Bahamas.

But Who’s Counting?

HHAS Infographic 15th anniversary

Click to check out our Retrospective Infographic!

Nearly 50% of the 2017 guests signed up to attend the cruise in 2018. This means HHAS is doing something right. They crunched the numbers and figured out that they’ve offered 1,738 classes over the last 14 years. They’ve been wide ranging, from yoga, Pilates, meditation, and fitness classes to cooking demonstrations and lectures on topics including plant-based nutrition, cardiovascular health, and integrative medicine. Each year, cruise goers look forward to the always inspiring Recovery Panel.

One year, the kitchen staff (led by the talented Mark Hanna) dished out nearly 38,000 meals in seven days. Kudos to the talented kitchen team! The gourmet meals for breakfast, lunch, and dinner are such an essential part of the experience.

Organizers also learned a lot from our experience running the cruise. During one of the first cruises, the ship left from Ft. Lauderdale only to realize that the majority of the produce order for the week didn’t make it onboard! Fortunately, they were able to contact the supplier who would bring them the greens at Key West (our first stop). There was a dock strike in Key West, so they had to be carried on case by case. Fortunately, it all worked out and the rest of the trip was smooth sailing. A good lesson in remembering the importance of going with the flow.

 

A Bright Future

Holistic Holiday at Sea sunsetSo many of you have adopted a plant-based diet because you want better health and a more peaceful world. While many guests have returned year after year, HHAS always welcomes aboard new faces! Make memories that will last forever and book today for the best rates and availability.

Here’s Who’s Cookin’ on the 2017 HHAS Cruise!

Posted on: No Comments

Pasta Holistic Holiday at SeaFrom galas and poolside socials to lectures and movement classes, this year’s Holistic Holiday at Sea has all the ingredients for a fun and educational experience. While every aspect is important, food is at the heart of it all. In elegant dining rooms, guests will be able to choose from sit-down menus for all three meals. There are also buffet options for breakfast and lunch.

Whether you’ve been following a plant-based diet for decades or you’ve recently considered switching to one, you’re likely on the lookout for delicious and easy recipes. Cooking classes led by master chefs are here to help! Guests can watch these demonstrations and sample some of the prepared food.

Cooking Classes Cover All the Basics—And Then Some!

Mother and daughter duo Ann and Jane Esselstyn will discuss and demonstrate the practical side of staying heart healthy in their cooking class, “The How and Wow: Discussion and Demo of the Guidelines to Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease.”

A hypnotherapist, macrobiotic cook, and actress, Jessica Porter is a highly entertaining performer who makes her lectures funny, inspiring, and informative. She will lead the cooking classes “Elegant Plant-Based Party Dishes” and “Optimum Health on a Plant-Based Diet.” She will also offer a Cooking Boot Camp titled “Cook Your Way to a Better Relationship: Kitchen Secrets for Creating Harmony, Laughter, and Sexual Spark.”

Author of seven books and widely acclaimed chef, Mark Reinfeld joins the Holistic Holiday at Sea team this year as a menu and recipe consultant. He contributed more than 25 vegan fusion recipes to this year’s menu.

Mark will celebrate the world’s plant-based cuisine, including raw items, in “Vegan Fusion Healthy Snacks and Salads.” Recipes include golden turmeric milk, hemp energy balls, and a raw walnut taco salad. Mark shares, “I like to empower people with as many of the tools and tips that I can share in a class or workshop. I show people how to view recipes as templates, or ‘Template Recipes.’ By altering any of the components in a dish, you can create a new recipe. So even in a short cooking demo I can share hundreds and even thousands of recipes.”

He views cooking classes as a form of food activism: “Empowering people with the tools they need to create healthy and delicious plant based cuisine is a way of promoting human health, protecting the environment and creating a more peaceful world. To me this is a worldwide movement.”

You’ll likely recognize Christina Pirello from her national public television series, Christina Cooks. In “To Soy or Not to Soy: That is the Question,” Christina will dive into controversy around what she calls this “oh so humble bean.” Most heart disease is preventable and treatable, and Christina believes it all begins in the kitchen. Learn how to make heart-healthy food choices in “The Heart of the Matter.”

During Cooking Boot Camp, “The Joy of Plant-based Cooking,” Christina will turn your passion for cooking “from simmer to boiling over.”

If you have the fantasy of sitting in the Italian countryside, enjoying a meal with your friends and family, Christina dives into the secrets of how to create authentic Italian cuisine in “The Italian Table.” Christina shares, “One of the big misconceptions about Italian food is that it’s all cheese and eggs, and nothing could be further from the truth. That’s the American approach to Italian food. I cook with more traditional techniques using whole grains, beans and veggies to create authentic Italian-style dishes, and I use some of my own tricks to create some of the familiar flavors we love with no compromise to wellness. In all my classes, people can expect to have their questions answered. to see some amazingly simple and delicious recipes prepared, and to leave the class with a deeper understanding of the subject.”

If you’re following popular vegan food blogger Kathy Patalsky, then you’ve likely read about her super popular veggie burger. “This is a very different variety of veggie burger because it is really not trying to imitate meat at all!” says Kathy, “It is just super flavorful and has a unique soft, yet burger-y texture!” In her cooking class, “Super Smoothies and Scrumptious Veggie Burgers,” Kathy will cover plenty of veggie burger variations and techniques, as well as smoothie techniques and flavor combinations, including superfood add-ins.Holistic Holiday at Sea Cuisine-1

Dig Right In!

Don’t miss your chance to learn a new recipe or three at this year’s Holistic Holiday at Sea cruise, embarking March 11! Cooking Boot Camps last two and a half hours and are priced at $150 per person. Click here for a full program schedule.

Four Amazing Stories of Health Recovery as Shared by Holistic Holiday at Sea Attendees

Posted on: No Comments

Recovery Panel at Holistic Holiday at Sea

From cancer recovery to animal rights activism, the reasons why people choose a plant-based and/or macrobiotic diet and lifestyle vary widely and, in many cases, overlap. Each year on the Holistic Holiday at Sea cruise, president Sandy Pukel arranges for a Recovery Panel on which a dozen courageous and grateful people share with the audience how their lives have changed thanks to a plant-based (and oftentimes macrobiotic) diet and lifestyle. “The heart and soul of the cruise is this Recovery Panel,” says Sandy. “People go there and listen to these stories. They come out crying, they come out inspired. It’s truly remarkable.”

Sandy, who discovered his life’s purpose after being introduced to macrobiotics in 1970, adds, “Over the years, I’ve seen remarkable recoveries. My answer always is: Macrobiotics works if you embrace it wholeheartedly. You’re going to see improvement. The whole philosophy and food thing is stronger than you are, if you’re willing to embrace it.”

One Family’s Story

Thomas Kahn

Thomas Kahn

Thomas Kahn attended the cruise in 2015 with his sister Susan Bondi. “I heard the cruise helps people who had the same problems I had,” says Thomas, who has type two diabetes. Three years prior to attending, Thomas had a heart scan that revealed the beginnings of blockage. At the time, at 5’7”, he weighed 240 pounds. Susan, a gourmet cook, followed a vegan, low-fat, oil-free diet, and influenced Thomas in making a shift. He lost most of his weight within a year. “I lost 80 lbs from diet alone,” he shares.

The cruise helped Thomas solidify his oil-free, plant-based diet and, over the years, he has been greatly influenced by cruise presenters Dr. Michael Gregor and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn. Thomas’ father was a type one diabetic who had a heart attack at age 49 while on the low carb diet. Doctors encouraged him to use olive oil. Nine years later, he was in need of a quadruple bypass. “The olive oil messed him up,” says Thomas. “Then he went on a true low-fat diet and lived to be 80.”

Thomas’ is just one of the inspirational stories we hear from our guests each year. We got the chance to catch up with past panelists Christina Pirello and Janet Vitt Sommer, and 2017 panelist Judy MacKenney to hear where they are in their journeys.

A Life of Gratitude

Christina Pirello, Holistic Holiday at Sea Recovery PanelAuthor of six bestselling cookbooks, Christina Pirello is also the Emmy Award-winning host of the national public television series Christina Cooks. She will lead four cooking classes on the 2017 Holistic Holiday at Sea and is on the faculty of The Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College.

At age 26, Christina was diagnosed with terminal leukemia and her cancer had already advanced to the acute stage. She saw a hematologist/oncologist who gave her three months to live with no treatment, and six months to a year with treatment. Having seen her mother pass away at the young age of 49 from cancer, Christina saw that conventional treatments seemed to have worsened her mother’s condition. Christina’s coworker suggested that she meet Robert “Bob” Pirello, a whole foods advocate. The two went grocery shopping together and Bob replaced all of the food Christina had at home with healthy options. He also gave her a copy of Michio Kushi’s The Cancer Prevention Diet, Revised and Updated Edition: The Macrobiotic Approach to Preventing and Relieving Cancer.

Christina’s strict macrobiotic diet consisted primarily of brown rice and millet, cooked vegetables (particularly green leafies and beans), tofu, tempeh, and miso soup. She went through a toxic discharge period, and knew that, despite the discomfort, her health was improving. Within 14 months after beginning her new diet, Christina’s white cell count was within the normal range. Hers is also a love story, as she and Bob later married!

Christina’s philosophy is that living a whole and healthy life should make us passionate and full of gratitude. Her recovery has helped her put things in perspective and she doesn’t waste time on petty things or people she does not resonate with. She shares, “It makes me humble and grateful for each moment of each day. My life is blessed, but since I don’t know how much time I have, I waste nothing. Each minute is precious although I admit I don’t fear death. I just feel like I am not done yet. I have work to do and would like to do more.” For more on Christina, visit her presenter page.

The Power of Food

janet-vitt-sommer-holistic-holiday-at-seaAlthough she will not be attending the 2017 cruise, Janet Vitt Sommer was on the Recovery Panel for more than ten years. In 1995, she was diagnosed with stage IV small cell lung cancer, with three tumors in her left lung, seven tumors in her right lung, three tumors in her liver, one on her pancreas, and another in her abdomen. A registered nurse since 1971, Janet saw her mother die from lung cancer at age 42 and knew the seriousness of this illness. “As a nurse, it’s difficult to believe I didn’t understand the power of food,” says Janet. “I thought of food as just nourishment, not a healing modality.”

Her oncologist said she had three to six months left to live. A dose of chemotherapy left Janet severely nauseous and underweight. Her internist Dr. Grossman, of Cleveland, Ohio, suggested that she try a macrobiotic diet. Janet enlisted the help of a macrobiotic counselor who told her she could be healed. After ten months on this healing regimen, her tumors disappeared.

Janet is now a nutritional counselor who leads cooking classes and prepares macrobiotic “meals to go.” The cruise has become an important part of her life—and romance! She and now husband Gary were married in Fort Lauderdale before the ship left the dock. “After all, where else could I go for my honeymoon and not have to prepare my own meals? Gary and I always get an efficiency suite when we travel. The cruise was perfect. Plus we were surrounded by many caring friends.”

Healing from the Inside Out

Judy MacKenney, Holistic Holiday at Sea Recovery PanelJudy MacKenney was introduced to macrobiotics in 1992 after receiving a diagnosis of stage IV non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. She completed seven months of chemotherapy and suffered from a multitude of side effects. Like Christina, she pored over Kushi’s The Cancer Prevention Diet after she was given a short time to live. “My new health regimen was to change my diet and lifestyle by eating organic whole foods, miso soup, grains, proteins, root, round & leafy vegetables, and pickles for enzymes, plus natural remedy drinks to cleanse and strengthen my body,” says Judy. “I also chewed my food seriously until it became liquid, walked, did breath work, body-scrubbed, developed a positive mindset to heal, and showed gratitude for everything in my life on a daily basis!”

This year, Judy celebrates 25 years of being cancer free. She shares, “I still rely on a plant-based, macrobiotic diet and lifestyle to keep me healthy. With so many delicious, nutritious recipes to choose from nowadays, I find it just keeps getting easier!” A Kushi-certified macrobiotic counselor, educator, and cooking instructor, Judy will share her story on this year’s Recovery Panel and facilitate a follow-up discussion group. Read more about Judy on her presenter page.

On Your Own Path to Wellness?

We’d love to help you wherever you are on your journey to feeling your best. Our 14th Holistic Holiday at Sea cruise is set for March 11–18, 2017. Book your spot today!

Vegan Cuisine at Its Finest

Posted on: No Comments

Vegan Pad Thai on Holistic Holiday at Sea cruiseNow in its 14th year, Holistic Holiday at Sea’s seven-day cruise experience, March 11–18, 2017, includes presentations by leading authorities in holistic and alternative health, offboard excursions at four exotic ports of call, workshops, and restorative activities such as yoga, Pilates, and meditation. From cooking classes to poolside socials, vegan cuisine is at the heart of the cruise, bringing people together to share delicious, healthy food with loved ones and new friends made aboard.

Guests enjoy meals in a continental atmosphere. Elegant dining rooms are staffed with attentive servers and food is expertly prepared under the supervision of Mark Hanna, an internationally known natural food chef who has cooked at yoga retreats, meditation centers, and macrobiotic and vegan conferences around the world. Head chef since Holistic Holiday at Sea’s debut in 2004, Hanna has designed the menu to feature dishes that are nutritious, delicious, and 100% vegan.

Options for Everyone

Chef Mark Hanna

Chef Mark Hanna

Cruise goers love that there are so many option to fit their dietary needs. “Over the years we’ve found that to happily include everybody, there needs to be options,” says Hanna. “We offer gluten-free and oil-free options in every case when the dish includes oil or gluten.” Please inform us of your dietary needs and we’ll do our best to accommodate you. The ship’s menu is also available on request.

For lunch and dinner, four-course meals (plus dessert) await you. Menus are often themed and work with innovative twists on traditional styles of cooking, such as Italian and Caribbean. Hanna shares, “My favorite menu over the last few years is the Thai-themed meal including Pad Thai—a tempeh dish, peanut sauce, etc. It’s a little bit spicy.” If you’re looking for a more informal, faster meal, buffet options are available for breakfast and lunch.

Desserts are sugar and dairy free and prepared by pastry chefs. The key lime pie and chocolate cake are among guests’ favorites. The menu changes each year, says Hanna, as people’s tastes change and there are always new trends to keep up with. Themes may be mixed and matched so that whole grains, vegan proteins, cooked and raw greens, and vegetables can be evenly incorporated over the course of the week.

Macrobiotic foods (such as seaweed, umeboshi, tamari, and miso) are also used in several dishes, and many macrobiotic principles are applied in the preparation, says Hanna.

Collaborations in the Kitchen

Chef Mark Reinfeld (Photo by Megan Sorel)

Chef Mark Reinfeld (Photo by Megan Sorel)

This year, Mark Reinfeld joins the team as a menu and recipe consultant. “I am excited to be sharing some of my Vegan Fusion recipes with the guests of the Holistic Holiday at Sea,” he says. Reinfeld is an award-winning chef and the author of seven books, including the best-selling 30 Minute Vegan series and his latest, Healing the Vegan Way. He has more than 20 years of experience preparing creative vegan and raw food cuisine.

One of the hopes of Holistic Holiday at Sea is that guests can learn new techniques to promote a healthier lifestyle. Reinfeld will be teaching a discussion and Q&A session titled “Food Activism: Bridging the Gap Between Nutritional Knowledge and Life-Changing Action.”

In his session, Reinfeld says he will “discuss the importance of creating plant-based food that tastes amazing, with tips and tricks on how to create world-class cuisine to share with others.”  

He will also present a template-recipe format that “allows you to break out of the recipe trap to create hundreds of variations of recipes.”

Why Wait? Our Recipe for Kale Salad

Vegan Kale Salad on Holistic Holiday at Sea cruise

Want to try one one of Mark Hanna’s dishes for yourself at home? Check out these steps to prepare a crowd pleasing Kale Salad as featured in Greens and Grains on the Deep Blue Sea Cookbook by Sandy Pukel and Mark Hanna.

The cabbage in this light, bright-colored, fiber-rich salad is pressed in the traditional Japanese manner. It is a perfect accompaniment to any meal.

Yields 6 to 8 servings

2 cups shredded red cabbage

2 teaspoons umeboshi paste

1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

1 ½ cups corn kernels

Pinch sea salt

5 cups finely chopped kale

1 cup julienne-cut carrots

1 cup red radishes, cut into thin half moons

1 cup julienne-cut daikon

3 tablespoons olive oil

3 tablespoons lemon juice

Vegetable salt to taste

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

To prepare:

  1. Press the cabbage with the umeboshi paste and vinegar for 1 hour.
  2. While the cabbage is pressing, fill a 4-quart pot halfway with water and bring to a boil. Add the corn and quickly blanch for a minute or two. Remove the corn with a slotted spoon and place in a large salad bowl.
  3. Add a pinch of salt to the same water, then add the kale and blanch for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and spread on a tray to cool.
  4. Add the cooked kale to the corn, along with the carrots, radishes, daikon, pressed cabbage, olive oil, and lemon juice. Toss the ingredients, add salt and pepper, and toss again before serving.

Variations:

-Add 1 teaspoon minced garlic or 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

-Add ¼ cup toasted pumpkin or sunflower seeds.

-Add sauerkraut or slivers of dill pickle.

Introduction Presenters Itinerary The Ship Cuisine Program Rates FAQs Sponsors
About Sandy About John Articles About the Cruise